FINE MOTOR SKILLS

CONDITIONS

'Fine motor' refers to small movements, such as using a pencil,
tying shoelaces, using cutlery, picking up small objects.

FINE MOTOR SKILLS

‘Fine motor’ refers to small movements, such as using a pencil, tying shoelaces, using cutlery, picking up small objects.

‘Gross motor’ refers to large movements, such as running, jumping, kicking and throwing.

Gross motor skills develop first and fine motor skills kick in later.

Our OT used the following terminology to explain why arts and crafts help with this:

Imagine a JCB digger. It has a cab (the body), a jib (arm) and a bucket (hand). The brain is the man in the cab, operating the digger. Fine motor skills are the last to kick in – gross motor (big body stuff) happens first. BUT – and it’s a big but – if the muscles in the hand are not ready to undertake fine motor functions when that kicks in, then there’s a problem.

Our client may be young and need some help with developing their fine motor skills. Or it may be that our client is older and is losing their fine motor skills and needs some help with retaining them. We can do both.

Difficulties with fine motor skills can cause frustration, disengagement with learning and mental wellbeing issues.  That is why it is so important to build and retain them to full potential.

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We build life skills through art with the following conditions

Mental Wellbeing

Dyspraxia

Sensory Processing

Autism

Dementia

Fine Motor Skills

Multiple Sclerosis